Blackjack 101: The Insurance Bet

Insurance bets are secondary bets offered to players when the dealer draws an Ace. These bets are worth half the value of your initial bet. The principle of the secondary bet is to bet that the dealer will draw a card worth ten after drawing an ace. If you’ve got it right, you’re playing blackjack.

Before revealing his hand, the dealer will ask the players if they wish to place an insurance bet or take an “Even Money.” Insurance stakes are worth half the original stake and pay 2: 1.

Many players argue that “Even Money” and insurance wagering are the same, as they are not! “Even Money” is offered to players who have played blackjack, while insurance is offered to all players around the table. By agreeing to take an “Even Money,” you secure payment of 1: 1. Which means you’re sure to get your bet back, and nothing more.

The insurance bet follows a different principle. It gives rise to two alternatives. If the dealer does blackjack, you win the secondary bet, in addition to recovering your initial bet. If, on the other hand, the croupier does not make blackjack, you lose the secondary bet but continue by playing the cards of your hand.

In simple terms, assuming you have placed an insurance bet worth $ 5 and the dealer draws a card of 10 after an ace, you win $ 15. You are particularly advantaged if you have a strong hand or blackjack. A strong hand indicates that you are likely to beat the dealer later in the game.

Why place an insurance bet?

The casinos offer a stack of classic blackjack games played with six to eight decks of cards. The addition of these card games shows that a classic blackjack has 312 to 416 cards. In a round, 120 to 160 cards have a value of 10. This means that once the dealer has drawn an ace, the chances of drawing a card worth 10 are high, and therefore proportional to those of making blackjack.

Blackjack is a simple game that can pay off big if you know how to strategize. Fortunately, there are tips to help you get the most out of your insurance stake. You certainly know some of them, because they are very widespread and used in the game. Using them will increase your chances of the insurance bet.

Tips for placing insurance

Insurance bets are most useful to you when the value of your hand is greater than 17 or when you are able to make a Blackjack. The dealer is less likely to draw a card worth ten than to draw a normal card. If the dealer does not make a blackjack and draws a card of a lower value than yours, you win the pay of 3: 2.

Another tip to make the most of the opportunity to place an insurance bet is to count cards. Card counting simply involves retaining the cards drawn by each player, including the dealer. This mainly involves monitoring high-value cards (Ace, Kings, Ladies. Jack and 10), low-value cards (2, 3, 4, 5.6) as well as neutral cards (7, 8, 9). The players study the data collected for each of the categories in order to predict the probabilities of drawing of such or such other cards. It may seem a little complicated. However, proper use of this technique will greatly decrease the risk of losing both your initial bet and your insurance bet.

Another effective tip for your insurance bet is to split your game or perform a “Split.” The most effective split to consider after placing the insurance bet is to split your Aces and the eight of you. If you have two aces and two eight in the same hand, you will win by dividing your game in half and drawing a new card for each game, and thus increasing your chances of making a Blackjack. Your chances of beating the dealer with an insurance bet and a split are very high.

Lastly, the following tip is generally undercut and little considered. However, an insurance bet is perfect when you have blackjack in your hand. An insurance bet placed when you have blackjack guarantees you a definite victory against the dealer because if the latter does not make a Blackjack, you will beat him for sure and will win 3: 2. However, if the dealer does a blackjack, there is “Push,” and you both get your initial bets.

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